BY SEAN CLARK

[In this feature, we highlight a handful of the best book reviews appearing over the weekend in major newspapers.]

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The Age of Miracles, by Karen Thompson Walker. Reviewed by Machiko Kakutani (New York Times).

This book’s been getting a fair amount of hype, but it does sound pretty good. As Kakutani describes it, the debut novel “reads as if it had been inspired by Bradbury’s classic tale [‘All Summer in a Day’] and sprinkled with some extra “Twilight Zone” magic dust.” Color me intrigued. The basic gist of the book is interesting: Earth’s rotation is slowing, so days and nights are growing longer and the schedule the entire world has been working and living on for millenia is tossed out of whack. If the actual story Walker writes is good enough to live up to the promising premise, this could certainly make for a special read. Give it a look.

Follow it on Goodreads.

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How to Build an Android, by David Duffy. Reviewed by Carolyn Kellogg (Los Angeles Times).

Some scientists built a robot replica of Phillip K. Dick, won a bunch of awards, then lost the robo-Dick’s head. Sounds like a pretty solid basis for a nonfic book, or at least an episode of This American Life. Good thing this guy Duffy documented the whole thing in a book. Or maybe anyway–Kellogg isn’t too impressed with his chops as a writer. Still, check out the review for the basic story, see if maybe it’s your bag anyway.

Follow it on Goodreads.

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Helen Keller in Love, by Rosie Sultan. Reviewed by Brigite Weeks (Washington Post).

I don’t think this is really a book for me, but, as Weeks points out, a Helen Keller romance is a fairly ballsy premise for a novel–I’ll give her that. It looks like Sultan pulled it off with a fair degree of success, too, so maybe it’s worth a shot for some people. It’s got housewife-book-club written all over it.

Follow it on Goodreads.

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Quickly: Literary Big Gulps. This WW2 spy book sounds okay. Dave eggers’s new book, A Hologram for the King, has kinda flown under the radar–but it sounds decent. These books about man’s relationship nature are intriguing too, as do a few of these fantasy books by female authors. James Patterson praises the power of kid books, though I sincerely doubt he actually writes his himself.

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Bonus Book Review: Been a while, but this is kinda funny. Bonus points for recruiting Samantha Bee.


(The embedding is being squirrely, so here’s the link if the video isn’t showing for you.)

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