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BY SEAN CLARK

[In this feature, we highlight a handful of the best book reviews appearing over the weekend in major newspapers.]

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Dodgers from Coast to Coast. Reviewed by Jon Thurber (Los Angeles Times).

With the Red Sox not doing much to improve an unapologetic and overrated pitching rotation, and my dynasty fantasy baseball team more or less built around the assumption that Clayton Kershaw is the second coming of Sandy Koufax, I’ve already found myself watching and listening to just as many Dodgers games as Sox games so far this year (MLB.tv’s stupid blackout restrictions have something to do with it, too.) But my fair-weather fandom aside, this book looks pretty cool. It compiles pictures of people and ephemera, but, most interestingly, it is punctuated with essays and reminiscences of famous Dodger personalities like Tommy Lasorda and Vin Scully. Baseball fans should give this a look. Also, it’s not too often you see a review of a coffee table book, so the review is neat in that regard as well.

Find it on Goodreads.

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The Sugar Frosted Nutsack, by Mark Leyner. Reviewed by Paul Di Filippo (Barnes and Noble Review).

Here’s another review of Leyner’s zany return to literature. I’m about halfway through this book myself, and having a hard time putting my thoughts about it into words. Di Filippo’s write-up is a bit more concise than the Ben Marcus review Nico briefly mentioned last week, and he’s able to sum this book up nicely:

If mythographer Joseph Campbell were still around to rewrite the Ramayana for the cast of Jersey Shore, the result might approximate Leyner’s novel — except without as many outrageously funny transgressive absurdities.

Find it on Goodreads.

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Regicide, by Nicholas Royle. Reviewed by Tori Truslow (Strange Horizons).

I really like the reviews they run over at Strange Horizons. They have a knack for dismantling a book (usually fantasy of some variety) and revealing all its faults, while still giving it the fairest shake they can. Truslow’s review of Regicide –a surreal-sounding book about an imaginary city in real-world Britain-is another example of a criticism that could very well be more interesting and entertaining than the book itself.

Find it on Goodreads.

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Quickly: Since I’m trying real hard but to have nothing but baseball on my mind this week, here’s a quality look at a whole bunch of baseball books out right now. Also: it’s a couple years old, but some guy made a pretty hefty Amazon list of baseball books that I’m really tempted to read all the way through. I loved The Bullpen Gospels, and Dirk Hayhurst’s next book is waiting for me at the library, so I’m pretty excited about that. One last, slightly different baseball-book list from the Daily Beast.

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